Physiotherapy Clinic - Leopardstown, Dublin | SoCo Performance
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Physio Clinic

During your time here in Physio @ SoCo, the aim is to get a thorough understanding of the root cause of your problem so we don’t just treat the surface cracks and ignore the real issues. Once we know what your goals are – whether it’s to get back to work, to be able to look over your shoulder or walk up and down stairs without pain, or to go in a car journey for more than a half hour without needing a helicopter evacuation afterwards – we will use the latest evidence-based treatment methods to both reduce your pain in the short-term and fix any underlying issues long-term, all the while optimizing your recovery process through the SoCo patient experience.

Conditions Treated

The most common muscles groups injured are the quads, hamstrings and calf because they cross 2 joints. Other common sites for muscle irritation and injury include the QL and gluteus medius in the lower back and hip, along with the upper traps and levator scapulae in the shoulders and neck.

  1. Muscle injuries account for up to 55% of all sporting injuries.
  2. Muscles are strained or torn when some or all of the fibres fail to cope with demands placed on them.
  3. The most common mechanism is through sudden acceleration or deceleration.
    • Severity graded on a scale of 1-3:
  • Grade 1 strain involves a small number of fibres, localised pain but no strength loss.
  • Grade 2 strain involves a more significant number of fibres damaged with pain and swelling, decreased strength and range of motion.
  • Grade 3 strain is a complete tear of all fibres, most commonly at the muscle-tendon junction.
    • Common causes of muscle strains:
  • Poor warm-up
  • Insufficient joint range of motion
  • Excessive muscle tightness
  • Fatigue/overuse
  • Poor recovery
  • Muscle imbalance
  • Previous injury
  • Poor technique/biomechanics
  • Spinal involvement
    • Acute management of muscle strains:
  • Early ice and compression
  • Short period of immobilisation/rest (depending on severity)
  • Early gentle movement exercises
  • Early gentle massage (from 24-48 hours depending on severity)
    • Contusion:

    • Commonly known as a ‘dead leg’ in the lower limbs. A blow to the muscle causes local muscle damage along with bleeding – a haematoma.
    • Management is through minimising bleeding, followed by progressive soft tissue release and strengthening. Heat, alcohol and deep massage early on can increase bleeding so are avoided.

The most common ligament injuries are seen in the ankle and knee following a sprain, and also in the shoulder-frequently in the AC joint.

  1. Ligaments are composed of closely packed collagen fibres that provide joint stability.
  2. Injured during excessive load.
    • Grades 1-3:

    • Grade 1 – stretched fibres, normal range of motion in the joint.
    • Grade 2 – damage to a considerable number of fibres, increased looseness in the joint..
    • Grade 3 – complete tear, no joint stability. Can be pain-free as nerve ends completely divided. Normally managed through surgery but sometimes (ankles and medial knee ligaments) managed non-surgically.
  3. Treatment aims: minimise swelling and bleeding, promote tissue healing, prevent joint stiffness, protect against further damage, strengthen muscles to provide additional joint stability.
  4. Torn collagen can take months to fully heal, but return to sport facilitated through strengthening local muscles, extra joint support (e.g. taping).

Most common joints irritated are in the neck (e.g. in whiplash), lower back and the knees in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis.

    • Joint irritation:

    • Commonly seen in the facet joints of the spine, this is often the cause of pain in the lower back or the neck, as seen in conditions like whiplash.
    • Dislocation/subluxation

    • A traumatic force applied to a joint can cause partial (subluxation) or complete (dislocation) dissociation of the articular surfaces of the joint.
    • Some joints are more prone to this dissociation than others due to their anatomy, for example the finger and shoulders, whereas other joints are very rarely subluxed or dislocated, such as the hip or sacro-iliac (SI) joint.
    • All subluxations and dislocations involve damage to surrounding soft tissue structures such as the joint capsule and ligaments and can involve associated nerve damage also.
    • All dislocations should be x-rayed to assess for the presence of an associated fracture.
    • Most dislocated joints can be relocated relatively easily and once this has been performed, a period of protective immobilisation is followed by gentle mobilisation and progressive strengthening.
    • Joint capsule issues:

    • An inflammatory overuse condition known as joint synovitis or capsulitis can occur. Its treated through a combination of rest, anti-inflammatories, and rehab.
    • Impingement syndromes:

    • Caused when two bony surfaces come into contact (Femoracetabular Impingement [FAI] in the hip and posterior impingement at the ankle are two of the most common), or a pinch on a structure passing between them causing damage to that structure, for example at the rotator cuff in the shoulder.
    • Treatment involves either surgery to remove the structural abnormality or rehab including biomechanical modification to relieve the impingement.

  1. Stress Fractures:
    • Fatigue failure of the bone. Can account for up to 20% of sports injuries but most common in athletics.
    • Normally bone adapts to repetitive stressing activity. Stress fractures occur when applied stresses surpass rate of adaptation in the bone.
    • Stages of bone response to load: silent stress reaction, leading to stress reaction, leading to stress fracture.
    • Females are from 1.2 to 10 times more likely to develop a stress fracture (female athlete triad: osteoporosis, menstrual irregularity, disordered eating can all have massive impact).
    • Diagnosed by localised pain during or after exercise that persists or increases if exercise continued or increased. Taken in conjunction with external factors like change in training load, surface, etc.
    • If suspected then they are normally confirmed by scan – x-ray, MRI, CT.
    • Most common sites – tibia, metatarsals, fibula, navicular, femur and pelvis.
    • Stress fractures classified into low risk or high risk.
    • Low risk fractures normally just require rest to allow healing. Low risk fractures include the femur, medial tibia, ulna and 1st-4th metatarsal in the foot. These are low risk because they are on the compressive side of the bone and respond well to activity modification.
    • High risk stress fractures notoriously difficult to manage, especially with diagnostic delay or less aggressive treatment, as they can easily progress to non-union or complete fracture. This scenario often means surgery is often needed to avoid the associated big increase in recurrence rates with such failed healing.
    • High stress locations include femoral neck, mid portion of the tibia, medial malleolus (ankle bone), talus, navicular, 5th metatarsal and sesamoid bones in the foot, and all require specific interventions other than rest.
    • Treatment options include avoiding aggravating activity; the majority of stress fractures heal within 6 weeks. Gradual return to activity is then implemented to allow bone adaptation to load along with the correction of any factors that contributed to the original injury
    • Osteitis and periostitis:

    • This is a bone inflammation due to overuse, impact trauma or abnormal appearance of cellular bone structure/tendon insertions causing excessive traction on the bone.
    • Most common is osteitis pubis of the pelvis – very common in kicking sports.
    • Treated through unloading muscle contraction on the bone, rest, correction of pre-disposing factors and progressive rehab.
    • Articular cartilage:

    • This is the protective surface lining joints which can undergo softening, tearing and ultimately visible degeneration.
    • Common in younger athletes at the patella.
    • Treated through rehab and biomechanical correction; more severe cases may need surgery (such a micro-fracture procedure).
    • Fractures:

    • Range from hairline to complete. Can be managed conservatively or surgically depending on site and severity of injury. Healing time varies but normally a minimum of 4-6 weeks up to 3 months+.

Common tendon issues are the achilles, the rotator cuff in the shoulder, and the elbow (tennis and golfer’s elbow)

Tendinopathy:

  • Most common overuse injury (previously known as tendinitis).
  • Clinical presentations include pain after exercise, pain to touch affected area, symptoms sometimes decreasing during exercise but returning during cool down.
  • Split into 3 stages: reactive tendinopathy, tendon dysrepair and degenerative tendinopathy which are progressively less common and harder to treat.
  • Reactive tendinopathy – occurs with an acute tension or compressive overload that causes the tendon to thicken and become less capable of handling load which is different to the normal tendon adaptation. It is normally caused by an overloaded tendon but this response can also happen with direct trauma to the tendon and is treated through rest, load management and rehab.
  • Tendon dysrepair – worsening condition in the tendon with greater cellular breakdown and disorganisation. Increased growth of blood vessels and nerves into the tendon (not a good thing!). Transition to this stage detected by ultrasound or MRI scan.
  • Degenerative tendinopathy – usually requires surgery to treat due to the commencement of cell death in the tendon due to the widespread growth of abnormal blood vessels and nerves. Uncommon in athletes except those who persist with substantial and repeated tendon load.

Bursitis

  • A bursa is a fluid filled pouch and there any many situated around the body at different joints in order to reduce friction.
  • Most commonly injured in overuse situations, but a direct blow to a bursa can cause traumatic bursitis due to bleeding into the bursa. It’s normally resolved through ice and compression.
  • More common for a bursa to be irritated through overuse than acutely, through excessive compressive and/or shearing forces. This usually occurs along with impingements or tendinopathies.
  • It presents as painful to touch with swelling and increased pain on activity. The treatment approach is normally rest, load management, anti-inflammatories and progressive rehab.
  • ITB syndrome (Runner’s knee) a common bursa overuse injury.

  • Pre-op? Post-op? If its bone, ligament, muscle, tendon or nerve related we can help! And if you’re not sure what category you fall into, then just get in touch and if we can’t help, we will point you in the right direction of someone who can.
  • A lot of people think that if they are due to have an operation – be it on a spine, a hip, a knee, etc – that the operation itself will fix everything. While it will go a long, long way to helping you with your symptoms, the follow-up rehabilitation is just as important, and can be more important in some cases.
  • We will liaise with your surgeon in coming up with a specific rehabilitation programme for you depending on the type of surgery you had, in line with your goals for your rehabilitation.
  • Likewise, a good programme of pre-operative treatment can often mean the difference to returning to full health versus 95%. When undergoing this type of treatment, we take into consideration your condition, current pain and activity levels, your date of operation, and your post-operative goals. Ultimately, the stronger you are going into your operation, the quicker you recover post-op and the better your recovery outcomes.
  • Whether pre-operative or post-operative, your treatment will consist of a tailored mix of the treatments offered as outlined below.

  • Some of the more common conditions seen for elderly patients include osteoarthritis, poor mobility, falls, post-operative care and fractures.
  • We will provide expert hands-on advice and treatment for the management of these conditions to return you back to full health and maximise your independence and function going forwards.

  • This is normally done as standard practice in your assessment.
  • It involves looking at how you hold yourself statically and how you hold yourself as you move.
  • Anything that may have caused your symptoms, contributed to your symptoms, or is a risk factor for the development of future symptoms can be identified and treated.

Specialist and confidential service. Information coming soon… please stay tuned for updates! 

  • Can have an initial assessment completed here in the clinic to assess if there is anything in your work set-up that might be causing or contributing to your symptoms, or to see if there is anything in your set-up that needs to change to help reduce the risk of future injuries.
  • On-site assessments can be arranged, please contact info@socoperformance.ie for further information.

Muscle Injuries

The most common muscles groups injured are the quads, hamstrings and calf because they cross 2 joints. Other common sites for muscle irritation and injury include the QL and gluteus medius in the lower back and hip, along with the upper traps and levator scapulae in the shoulders and neck.

  1. Muscle injuries account for up to 55% of all sporting injuries.
  2. Muscles are strained or torn when some or all of the fibres fail to cope with demands placed on them.
  3. The most common mechanism is through sudden acceleration or deceleration.
    • Severity graded on a scale of 1-3:

    • Grade 1 strain involves a small number of fibres, localised pain but no strength loss.
    • Grade 2 strain involves a more significant number of fibres damaged with pain and swelling, decreased strength and range of motion.
    • Grade 3 strain is a complete tear of all fibres, most commonly at the muscle-tendon junction.
    • Common causes of muscle strains:

    • Poor warm-up
    • Insufficient joint range of motion
    • Excessive muscle tightness
    • Fatigue/overuse
    • Poor recovery
    • Muscle imbalance
    • Previous injury
    • Poor technique/biomechanics
    • Spinal involvement
    • Acute management of muscle strains:

    • Early ice and compression
    • Short period of immobilisation/rest (depending on severity)
    • Early gentle movement exercises
    • Early gentle massage (from 24-48 hours depending on severity)
    • Contusion:

    • Commonly known as a ‘dead leg’ in the lower limbs. A blow to the muscle causes local muscle damage along with bleeding – a haematoma.
    • Management is through minimising bleeding, followed by progressive soft tissue release and strengthening. Heat, alcohol and deep massage early on can increase bleeding so are avoided.

Ligament Injuries

The most common ligament injuries are seen in the ankle and knee following a sprain, and also in the shoulder-frequently in the AC joint.

  1. Ligaments are composed of closely packed collagen fibres that provide joint stability.
  2. Injured during excessive load.
    • Grades 1-3:

    • Grade 1 – stretched fibres, normal range of motion in the joint.
    • Grade 2 – damage to a considerable number of fibres, increased looseness in the joint..
    • Grade 3 – complete tear, no joint stability. Can be pain-free as nerve ends completely divided. Normally managed through surgery but sometimes (ankles and medial knee ligaments) managed non-surgically.
  3. Treatment aims: minimise swelling and bleeding, promote tissue healing, prevent joint stiffness, protect against further damage, strengthen muscles to provide additional joint stability.
  4. Torn collagen can take months to fully heal, but return to sport facilitated through strengthening local muscles, extra joint support (e.g. taping).

Joint Injuries

Most common joints irritated are in the neck (e.g. in whiplash), lower back and the knees in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis.

    • Joint irritation:

    • Commonly seen in the facet joints of the spine, this is often the cause of pain in the lower back or the neck, as seen in conditions like whiplash.
    • Dislocation/subluxation

    • A traumatic force applied to a joint can cause partial (subluxation) or complete (dislocation) dissociation of the articular surfaces of the joint.
    • Some joints are more prone to this dissociation than others due to their anatomy, for example the finger and shoulders, whereas other joints are very rarely subluxed or dislocated, such as the hip or sacro-iliac (SI) joint.
    • All subluxations and dislocations involve damage to surrounding soft tissue structures such as the joint capsule and ligaments and can involve associated nerve damage also.
    • All dislocations should be x-rayed to assess for the presence of an associated fracture.
    • Most dislocated joints can be relocated relatively easily and once this has been performed, a period of protective immobilisation is followed by gentle mobilisation and progressive strengthening.
    • Joint capsule issues:

    • An inflammatory overuse condition known as joint synovitis or capsulitis can occur. Its treated through a combination of rest, anti-inflammatories, and rehab.
    • Impingement syndromes:

    • Caused when two bony surfaces come into contact (Femoracetabular Impingement [FAI] in the hip and posterior impingement at the ankle are two of the most common), or a pinch on a structure passing between them causing damage to that structure, for example at the rotator cuff in the shoulder.
    • Treatment involves either surgery to remove the structural abnormality or rehab including biomechanical modification to relieve the impingement.

Bone Injuries

  1. Stress Fractures:
    • Fatigue failure of the bone. Can account for up to 20% of sports injuries but most common in athletics.
    • Normally bone adapts to repetitive stressing activity. Stress fractures occur when applied stresses surpass rate of adaptation in the bone.
    • Stages of bone response to load: silent stress reaction, leading to stress reaction, leading to stress fracture.
    • Females are from 1.2 to 10 times more likely to develop a stress fracture (female athlete triad: osteoporosis, menstrual irregularity, disordered eating can all have massive impact).
    • Diagnosed by localised pain during or after exercise that persists or increases if exercise continued or increased. Taken in conjunction with external factors like change in training load, surface, etc.
    • If suspected then they are normally confirmed by scan – x-ray, MRI, CT.
    • Most common sites – tibia, metatarsals, fibula, navicular, femur and pelvis.
    • Stress fractures classified into low risk or high risk.
    • Low risk fractures normally just require rest to allow healing. Low risk fractures include the femur, medial tibia, ulna and 1st-4th metatarsal in the foot. These are low risk because they are on the compressive side of the bone and respond well to activity modification.
    • High risk stress fractures notoriously difficult to manage, especially with diagnostic delay or less aggressive treatment, as they can easily progress to non-union or complete fracture. This scenario often means surgery is often needed to avoid the associated big increase in recurrence rates with such failed healing.
    • High stress locations include femoral neck, mid portion of the tibia, medial malleolus (ankle bone), talus, navicular, 5th metatarsal and sesamoid bones in the foot, and all require specific interventions other than rest.
    • Treatment options include avoiding aggravating activity; the majority of stress fractures heal within 6 weeks. Gradual return to activity is then implemented to allow bone adaptation to load along with the correction of any factors that contributed to the original injury
    • Osteitis and periostitis:

    • This is a bone inflammation due to overuse, impact trauma or abnormal appearance of cellular bone structure/tendon insertions causing excessive traction on the bone.
    • Most common is osteitis pubis of the pelvis – very common in kicking sports.
    • Treated through unloading muscle contraction on the bone, rest, correction of pre-disposing factors and progressive rehab.
    • Articular cartilage:

    • This is the protective surface lining joints which can undergo softening, tearing and ultimately visible degeneration.
    • Common in younger athletes at the patella.
    • Treated through rehab and biomechanical correction; more severe cases may need surgery (such a micro-fracture procedure).
    • Fractures:

    • Range from hairline to complete. Can be managed conservatively or surgically depending on site and severity of injury. Healing time varies but normally a minimum of 4-6 weeks up to 3 months+.

Tendon Injuries

Common tendon issues are the achilles, the rotator cuff in the shoulder, and the elbow (tennis and golfer’s elbow)

Tendinopathy:

  • Most common overuse injury (previously known as tendinitis).
  • Clinical presentations include pain after exercise, pain to touch affected area, symptoms sometimes decreasing during exercise but returning during cool down.
  • Split into 3 stages: reactive tendinopathy, tendon dysrepair and degenerative tendinopathy which are progressively less common and harder to treat.
  • Reactive tendinopathy – occurs with an acute tension or compressive overload that causes the tendon to thicken and become less capable of handling load which is different to the normal tendon adaptation. It is normally caused by an overloaded tendon but this response can also happen with direct trauma to the tendon and is treated through rest, load management and rehab.
  • Tendon dysrepair – worsening condition in the tendon with greater cellular breakdown and disorganisation. Increased growth of blood vessels and nerves into the tendon (not a good thing!). Transition to this stage detected by ultrasound or MRI scan.
  • Degenerative tendinopathy – usually requires surgery to treat due to the commencement of cell death in the tendon due to the widespread growth of abnormal blood vessels and nerves. Uncommon in athletes except those who persist with substantial and repeated tendon load.

Bursa Injuries

Bursitis

  • A bursa is a fluid filled pouch and there any many situated around the body at different joints in order to reduce friction.
  • Most commonly injured in overuse situations, but a direct blow to a bursa can cause traumatic bursitis due to bleeding into the bursa. It’s normally resolved through ice and compression.
  • More common for a bursa to be irritated through overuse than acutely, through excessive compressive and/or shearing forces. This usually occurs along with impingements or tendinopathies.
  • It presents as painful to touch with swelling and increased pain on activity. The treatment approach is normally rest, load management, anti-inflammatories and progressive rehab.
  • ITB syndrome (Runner’s knee) a common bursa overuse injury.

Pre- and post-operative care

  • Pre-op? Post-op? If its bone, ligament, muscle, tendon or nerve related we can help! And if you’re not sure what category you fall into, then just get in touch and if we can’t help, we will point you in the right direction of someone who can.
  • A lot of people think that if they are due to have an operation – be it on a spine, a hip, a knee, etc – that the operation itself will fix everything. While it will go a long, long way to helping you with your symptoms, the follow-up rehabilitation is just as important, and can be more important in some cases.
  • We will liaise with your surgeon in coming up with a specific rehabilitation programme for you depending on the type of surgery you had, in line with your goals for your rehabilitation.
  • Likewise, a good programme of pre-operative treatment can often mean the difference to returning to full health versus 95%. When undergoing this type of treatment, we take into consideration your condition, current pain and activity levels, your date of operation, and your post-operative goals. Ultimately, the stronger you are going into your operation, the quicker you recover post-op and the better your recovery outcomes.
  • Whether pre-operative or post-operative, your treatment will consist of a tailored mix of the treatments offered as outlined below.

Elderly physiotherapy

  • Some of the more common conditions seen for elderly patients include osteoarthritis, poor mobility, falls, post-operative care and fractures.
  • We will provide expert hands-on advice and treatment for the management of these conditions to return you back to full health and maximise your independence and function going forwards.

Postural assessments

  • This is normally done as standard practice in your assessment.
  • It involves looking at how you hold yourself statically and how you hold yourself as you move.
  • Anything that may have caused your symptoms, contributed to your symptoms, or is a risk factor for the development of future symptoms can be identified and treated.

Pregnancy related pain

  • As you progress through your pregnancy, your body goes through certain physiological and structural changes to prepare you for delivery. These changes can sometimes lead to the development of musculoskeletal issues such as low back pain from an increased anterior pelvic tilt as your bump gets bigger, or structural changes to the orientation of joints and increased muscle tension in your thoracic spine causing localised pain along with referred pain down into the arms and hands.
  • Other common complaints include hip and knee pain, leg cramps and abdominal pain.
  • These musculoskeletal issues can be very easily treated through any of the treatments outlined below.
  • They can also be treated very effectively through our Clinical Pilates @ SoCo service, please get in touch with us for further information.
  • Alternatively, specific exercise regimens can be created for you using our Ex Phys @ SoCo service

Women's Health

Specialist and confidential service. Information coming soon… please stay tuned for updates! 

Ergonomic assessment & advice

  • Can have an initial assessment completed here in the clinic to assess if there is anything in your work set-up that might be causing or contributing to your symptoms, or to see if there is anything in your set-up that needs to change to help reduce the risk of future injuries.
  • On-site assessments can be arranged, please contact info@socoperformance.ie for further information.

Joint Mobilisation @ SoCo Performance

Joint Mobilisation

  • A passive movement technique where an oscillatory force is applied by the physiotherapist to a joint (spinal or peripheral) within pain limits.
  • The aim of this treatment is to restore full range of motion to a joint that has been detected as being stiff.
  • Mobilisation also helps desensitise a painful area through activation and deactivation of appropriate nerve fibres.
Dry Needling @ SoCo Performance

Dry Needling

  • Dry needling is a practice that has been in use by physiotherapists since the 1980s and differs from acupuncture which is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that deals with flows of energy in the body through insertion of needles into corresponding acupuncture points.
  • Dry needling by contrast, utilises the same needles but in a different way. Very thin needles are inserted into a muscle or soft tissue with the aim of achieving pain relief. There are two techniques employed here at SoCo, depending on your presentation your physio will decide which is most appropriate.
• Trigger point needling
The traditional method of dry needling, this involves the insertion of a needle into the trigger point of a muscle. A trigger point is basically a tight band of tissue within a muscle which disrupt the function of the muscle and can cause both local and referred (travelling) pain. The aim of this is to achieve a ‘twitch response’ – normally indicative of the trigger point releasing – which is associated with the release of muscle tension and achieving a reduction in pain.
Movement Re-ediucation @ SoCo Performance

Movement Re-education

  • This involves the addressing of your ‘biomechanics’- i.e. how you move.
  • You may have a pre-existing faulty movement pattern (e.g. excessive use of your lower back in picking something up from the floor, or poor single leg control causing a foot injury) that caused your injury, or you may have developed a faulty movement pattern as a result of your injury which is now causing you extra problems (e.g. a knee injury causing a limp, leading to the development of low back pain). Either way, that movement pattern needs to be identified and corrected.
  • This is done through a combination of hands-on manual therapy techniques alongside rehabilitation exercises.
Individual Rehabilitation @ SoCo Performance

Individual Rehabilitation - Strengthening & Conditioning

  • During your treatment, we will create a tailored exercise regimen for you to complete at a location convenient to you whether that is at home, the gym, the pool, the park, wherever!
  • This regimen will contain exercises targeting specific changes in the body – e.g. glutes strengthening exercises, core activation exercises, shoulder motor pattern control exercises – with prescription variations depending on what we are trying to achieve. This can be done by adjusting the volume and load used to create the changes and adaptations we are looking for.
  • If it is needed to assist in your rehabilitation or is one of your goals, elements of cardiovascular conditioning at a level appropriate to you can be included also.
Soft-tissue Therapy

Soft Tissue Therapy

  • Used to treat soft tissue (muscle, tendon, ligament, joint capsule, nerve) abnormalities such as increased muscle tension, myofascial trigger points, and thickening of connective tissue.
  • Common techniques include digital ischaemic pressure (application of sustained pressure towards the centre of muscle to improve blood flow, encourage release of natural pain-mediators in the blood, and reduce muscle tension), and sustained myofascial tension (applying pressure in the direction of the soft tissue restriction in order to restore optimum length to the tissue in the exact location where any abnormal thickening is present).
  • A Sports Massage can incorporate many of these techniques.
  • Maximum benefits of soft tissue treatment are seen when used in combination with other treatments, such as joint mobilisations or rehabilitation.
Manual Traction @ SoCo Performance

Manual Traction

  • A type of manual therapy involving intermittent or sustained pressure on a joint in order to distract or space joint surfaces whose proximity is causing a source of irritation. 
  • It is commonly used as a treatment for neck pain as it spaces the intervertebral joints, reduces tension on the spinal ligaments, and stretches the spinal musculature.
Taping @ SoCo Performance

Taping

  • Taping can be utilised in a number of different ways, and there are numerous different types and sizes of tape to fit what you need.
  • It can be used to provide stability to a joint and surrounding soft tissue structures after an injury, e.g. an ankle after a sprain.
  • It can be used to correct biomechanics and reduce problematic movement patterns, e.g. taping of the foot to provide more dynamic arch control.
  • It can be used in injury prevention – e.g. use of kinesio tape to help reduce muscle tension in the hamstrings.
Neural Mobilisation @ SoCo Performance

Neural Mobilisation

  • ’Neurodynamics’ is a term used to describe the physiological, biomechanical and structural state of the body’s nervous system.
  • Neural mobilisation or stretching is a technique used to restore balance to this system, mainly through increasing the ease at which a nerve can glide by reducing adhesions to surrounding structures, along with improving blood flow to the nerve.
Orthotic Advice @ SoCo Performance

Orthotic Advice

  • We can advise on whether foot orthoses may be of benefit to you in terms of helping fix and prevent a recurrence of your injury.
Onwards Referral @ SoCo Performance

Onwards Referral

  • Here at SoCo, we enjoy a close working relationship with local GPs and The Beacon Hospital with streamlined access for further investigations such as scans and blood tests, and quicker access to fantastic consultants.
  • If we are unable to fix you, we will get you to someone who can as soon as possible.
Fees
Initial
Consultation

Time: 45mins
Price: €80

Follow-Up Consultation

Time: 30mins
Price: €60

Extended Follow-Up Consultation

If presenting with more than one complaint at the initial assessment, we have the option of an extended follow-up to reflect the increased time to properly treat all conditions.

Time: 45mins
Price: €80

Walk-in Triage
Consultation

Time: 15mins
Price: €30

Telehealth (online)
Consultation

Time: 15mins
Price: €30

Sports Taping

Time: 15mins
Price: €30

Sports Massage

Time: 30mins
Price: €50

Workstation Ergonomic Assessment & Advice
Corporate Seminars
Please contact
info@socoperformance.ie for further information